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Tip-a-Day for May: Celiac Awareness Month

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Tip-yellow postit # 3: Looking for Soy

I’m going to start calling these TTT’s to save on typing.

San-J Tamari SauceToday’s TTT is about Soy sauce. Andy loved getting Chinese take-out.  I liked it because it was easy. We also make what we call “fried rice” a lot to deal with leftovers. One of the surprises for me in this journey with Celiac disease, is that soy sauce has gluten in it.

We found a great alternative in San-J, certified gluten-free Tamari Sauce. 

San-J has a number of products. Our favorites are low sodium Tamari Sauce and the Sweet and Tangy sauce. They also make individual serving packets of Tamari sauce that are useful in lunches and on the go.

I met the owner when he just finished the process of becoming a certified gluten-free company at an exhibit. He smiled from ear-to-ear when I told him our story and that his products brought something good back to our menu.

(Just in case you’re wondering, we receive nothing in return for sharing the products we use in our home. These are unsolicited recommendations.)

Share your favorite Gluten-Free tips on my Facebook Page. (and like the page while you're there!) The more we share, the more we can all expand our palate.

 

 

Tip-A-Day for 31 Days: Celiac Awareness Month

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Tip-yellow postit

# 2: What's in the Pantry?


When we bought our house I didn't know what a good pantry was. I was thrilled just to have one. This pantry needs work, though, and is on my list of "home improvements." I need to re-organize it every six months because it's impossible to keep things in it neatly. However, if you're new to living gluten-free, the pantry and cupboards are a good place to begin. Look for anything that has gluten in it and put it aside. Flour and Barley are easy. It's the mixes, boxed items, and prepared foods that are tricky.  Be sure to read all the labels. Even the Corn Chips. 

Take a good look at all those things. See any mystery items? You know ...the things you bought because it sounded good at the time. Anything you've not eaten in 6 months is probably safe to toss.
Divide the rest into essential and non-essential items. An essential item is something someone in the house can not live without. You buy them every week and they are gone before the next trip to the grocery store.
Make a list of those essential items. Those are the things you must find a a gluten-free alternative that your family likes. 

It may take some time, but I'm convinced it's possible. Share your finds on my Facebook Page - you never know who has been looking high and low for months on end for the same thing!

See you tomorrow!

joan sig

 

 

Since I didn't start on May 1st, I decided it might be more thoughtful to allow you to receive the Tip-a-Day x 31 Days for Celiac Awareness in your email box. I'd have trouble remembering to check in. So if you'd like to receive this series in your email, you can sign up by filling out the form at the bottom of the page.

 

You can start any time. They'll come in order, 31 Tips, Tools, or Tried and True Tasty Tidbits (read products)  in all.  They're short and to the point.

Click here to receive these tips, tricks, tools and techniques in your email box each day for 31 days. 


Tip-A-Day for May: Celiac Awareness Month

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May is Celiac Awareness Month. I’m late joining the celebration. It’s actually consistent with my real life. I’m usually a few minutes late. The question is, what do I want people to notice when

celiac-ribbon-w I arrive?  This month, I want you to hone in on the topic and related tips, and tools for Celiac disease. 

Awareness about celiac disease is especially important for people with Down syndrome and those who support them. Regardless of family history, it’s a possibility for everyone with Down syndrome.

With that in mind, I’ve decided to share a tip a day in the month of May about Celiac disease and it’s treatment, a gluten-free diet.  Because I am starting 10 days late, I’ll be doubling up in the beginning.

Tip #1:  Learn about Celiac Disease.

What is Celiac disease?

Celiac Facts Page 1wThe short answer: Celiac disease is an allergy to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in certain foods: wheat, barley, rye, and some oats. When baked, it gives bread it’s fluff.

Learn more about Celiac disease for Individuals with Down syndrome here

If you are a parent print this Celiac Fact Sheet to share with your child’s  Primary Care Provider. If you work for an agency, share this information with your team.

Follow My Tips on Pinterest

Follow my Celiac Awareness Month Board on Pinterest! All the tips for the month will be posted there, and more.   Pinterest is a fun, visual way to gather “web finds” so you can grab them later.

Share Your Story

Share your favorite Gluten-Free tips on my Facebook Page. (and like the page while you're there!) The more we share, the more we can all expand our palate.

 

Get a "Tip-a-Day" for May (or 31 days) in your email box.  

Since I didn't start on May 1st, I decided it might be more thoughtful to allow you to get the Tip-a-Day x 31 Days for Celiac Awareness in your email box. I'd have trouble remembering to check in. So if you'd like to receive this series in your email, you can sign up by filling out the form at the bottom of the page.

You can start any time. They'll come in order, 31 Tips, Tools, or Tried and True Tasty Tidbits (read products)  in all.  They're short and to the point.

Sign up Celiac Awareness Tip-a-Day for 31 Days

Happy Celiac Awareness Month!

joan sig

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#Justiceforethan

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justiceforethan

Today I changed my FB profile to this image.  #justiceforethan. 

Why?

Not because it's trendy.

Not because the vast majority of Americans agree with me and want to make a visual statement (though that would be really cool!). 

Not because I know Ethan personally.

I did it because Ethan did not deserve to die.

Ethan was a 26 year old man with Down syndrome. From what I've read about him, he sounds like a pretty typical guy with Down syndrome. He was a little heavy, but he as a nice guy. I don't know if he had a job, but if he's like most adults with Down syndrome, it wasn't a full time job if he did. He left the education system 4 or 5 years ago and the challenge is to keep him engaged, challenged, and enjoying his life. One thing I do know:  he loved movies.

He went to see a movie with his support person. He must have had a good time because he wasn't ready to leave when it was over.

As a result, he died.

You can read the story here.

The medical examimer proclaimed it a homocide.

The Grand Jury felt no criminal charges needed to be filed.

I am certain - beyond a shadow of a doubt - that the off-duty policemen working as security did not plan to harm Ethan, let alone kill him. I am equally sure that they were more concerned about expeditious compliance than listening. Cops can be that way. I'm married to one. I know. 

One of the most difficult things for peace officers to learn is that when dealing with a perosn with an intellectual or developmental disability, demands and pressure only make the person shut down. It isn't noncompliance, it's fear. 

All it takes is to step back, take a breath, wait for his parents or support person to arrive, and give him some time to work out that he can't have his way...this time.

I found my profile image on this blog: "A Little Bit of Moxy. Conversations About Disability, Travel, and Art."  It's a provocative, well written piece. I was already haunted by Ethan's story...which could easily be my son's story. Or the story of many, many people with Down syndrome and related disabilties I am honored to know.  

A more neutral account is here by Meliss Stolz of Garden of My Heart.

There is an online petition to seek further investigation into Ethan's needless death. It's right here. Take the time to add your voice to this injustice.

And if Ethan's story has affected you and you are a FaceBook user, Why not use this as your profile picture too?

Think of what it would mean to Ethan's parents. 

Instructions:

Right click on the image: Select "Save Image As" and save it to your hard drive. Then upload it as your profile picture.

If you tweet, talk about this and use the hastag #justiceforethan.

It's on my list of things to do.

I owe it to Ethan's Mom.  

I owe it to Ethan.